Newsletter stories

  • SPOTLIGHT STORY: Medicine is a 'team sport' now - School deans discuss their plans for collaboration across disciplines
  • New program broadens paths to leadership - A conversation with Amparo Villablanca, M.D.
  • Rachel Whitmer - ELAM fellow is school's first female Target of Excellence hire
  • Fellowships help UC Davis Health faculty refine leadership EQ
  • New Faculty Welcome - A welcome to new faculty colleagues
  • Collaboration is our path to the future- by David A. Lubarsky, M.D., MBA

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SPOTLIGHT: Medicine is a 'team sport' now

School deans discuss their plans for collaboration across disciplines

Since the mid-20th century, the health care landscape has undergone a continuum of systemic changes — most but not all of which have been beneficial. Research findings and scientific advancements in diagnostic technology and treatments have led to greatly improved health care outcomes in a predominant number of cases, even while the health care field has convulsed under economic pressures that have compromised affordability, accessibility and health care equity for many people. Newly appointed education leaders at the UC Davis Health campus in Sacramento see opportunities, however, to make advancements and rectify shortcomings by restructuring the models of health care education and delivery.

“We believe that team-based care gives better outcomes,” Brashear said, including physician assistants and nurse practitioners, physical and occupational therapists, and social workers in the makeup of a care team.”

Allison Brashear, dean of the UC Davis School of Medicine, and Stephen J. Cavanagh, dean of the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, are strong advocates of interprofessional education and team-based patient care, and view such collaboration as instrumental in the evolution of health care.

Only a few weeks after stepping into their new roles this past July, Brashear and Cavanagh chatted with an interviewer about their views on collaboration between their schools and among health care professionals.

“We believe that team-based care gives better outcomes,” Brashear said, including physician assistants and nurse practitioners, physical and occupational therapists, and social workers in the makeup of a care team. “Medicine is really a team sport now.”

Observing that health care traditionally has been “siloed” in thinking and practice, Cavanagh said, “Team-based care is all about bringing the best of everything together, and that’s how we can impact patient care and outcomes as much as possible.”

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