Meghan Miller, Ph.D.

Meghan Miller, Ph.D.Principal Investigator

Meghan Miller, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and the MIND Institute. Her research uses a developmental psychopathology framework to understand the early emergence of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a particular focus on ASD and ADHD. The long-range goal is that this work will help identify factors that account for the transition from risk to disorder, and will be highly translational, delineating core shared processes to be targeted by transdiagnostic prevention and early intervention efforts. Dr. Miller is also a licensed clinical psychologist.

Natalie Finnegan

Natalie FinneganStudent Assistant

Natalie Finnegan is a third-year undergraduate at UC Davis, and a Student Assistant in Dr. Meghan Miller's lab. She is currently pursuing a B.S. in Evolutionary Anthropology and a B.S. in Psychology, with plans to graduate in June 2021. Her tasks include behavioral coding, camera operation, and administrative activities.

Elise Hanzel, Ph.D.

Elise Hanzel, Ph.D.Examiner

Dr. Hanzel has been a staff psychologist at the MIND Institute since 2007 and joined the Early Risk Study in 2018. She is a licensed clinical psychologist, and her work focuses on the assessment and diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorders and behavioral and developmental therapeutic interventions for children and families. Dr. Hanzel earned her B.A. from Boston University and her Ph.D. from the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University.

Burt Hatch, Ph.D.

Burt HatchPostdoctoral Fellow

Burt Hatch is a postdoctoral fellow in the Autism Research Training Program. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Otago, where he studied emotional and social information processing in children with ADHD as well as the impact of behavioral interventions targeting infant sleep on early childhood functioning. His current research is focused understanding the extent to which different disorders that emerge across infancy to childhood-particularly autism spectrum disorder and ADHD- overlap in terms of particular risk factors and functional outcomes.

Ana-Maria Iosif, Ph.D.

Ana-Maria IosifBiostatistician

Ana-Maria Iosif, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in Statistics from the University of Pittsburgh in 2007. Her primary methodological research interest lies in the analyses of data with complex structure, including repeated measures, longitudinal assessments with dropouts, and clustered data with informative cluster size. Her interdisciplinary work focuses on mental health and she enjoys a very productive collaboration with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

Girija Kadlaskar, Ph.D.

Girija Kadlaskar, Ph.D.Postdoctoral Fellow

Girija Kadlaskar is a postdoctoral fellow in the Autism Research Training Program. She received her Ph.D. in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences from Purdue University where she examined sensory processing, particularly touch, in infants at risk for, as well as in older children diagnosed with, ASD. Her current research is focused on understanding the developmental trajectories of sensory processing differences in infants at risk for ASD and ADHD. The long-term goal is to examine whether differences in sensory response patterns could serve as reliable early risk markers for ASD and ADHD.

Jocelynn Morales-Martinez

Jocelynn Morales-MartinezJunior Specialist

Jocelynn Morales-Martinez is a Junior Specialist with the Early Risk Study and the LAAMB Study at the MIND Institute. She received her B.S. in Psychology with a Biological Emphasis and a minor in Spanish from the University of California Davis. Her research interests include the early manifestation of ASD and ADHD in infants, and the impact early intervention has on later development and cognition. In the future, Jocelynn hopes to continue her education and pursue a career in Clinical Psychology.

Marissa Montejano, M.S., CF-SLP

ExamineMarissa Montejano, M.S., CF-SLPr/LEND Trainee

Marissa Montejano is a LEND Trainee/Speech Language Pathology Clinical Fellow at the MIND Institute and an examiner with the LAAMB and Early Risk Studies. She received her master's degree in Speech and Hearing Sciences from Portland State University in 2020. There, Marissa served as a research assistant researching sibling-mediated interventions with children on spectrum and the effects on social communication behaviors and language. Her current research interests include early identification of ASD and ADHD. Marissa's clinical work focuses on providing early childhood assessment and intervention services to individuals on the spectrum and with other neurodevelopmental disorders.

Mak Soller, B.A.

Mak SollerStudent Assistant

Makayla Soller is a Student Assistant in the Miller Lab at the MIND Institute. She is currently a third-year undergraduate at the University of California, Davis working to receive a B.A. in Psychology with minors in Human Development and Sociology. She will graduate in March of 2021 and hopes to continue to do research in the psychology field. Within the Miller Lab she helps with behavioral coding, camera operation, and administrative activities.

Gregory S. Young, Ph.D.

Gregory S. Young, Ph.D.Co-Investigator

Dr. Gregory Young is n Associate Research Scientist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and a developmental psychologist. He specializes in longitudinal research design and analysis, with an interest in eye-tracking and behavioral coding as ways to measure intra-individual change as it relates to typical development and the early onset of developmental disorders such as autism. He collaborates with Dr. Miller on studies of the onset of and overlap between autism and ADHD in infants and young children, with Drs. Sally Rogers and Sally Ozonoff on studies of the onset and treatment of autism in infant siblings and young preschoolers, and with Dr. Julie Schweitzer on the role of norepinephrine and the locus coeruleus in ADHD as measured by pupil dilation dynamics. Dr. Young also has specific interests and expertise in statistical analysis techniques using hierarchical generalized models as applied to growth curve analysis, Rasch measurement modeling, and sequential analysis of time series data. Additionally, he has expertise in database programming and advanced data processing algorithms for use with methodologies such as eye-tracking and behavioral coding.

Yue Yu, Ph.D.

Examiner/Postdoctoral Fellow

Yue Yu is a postdoctoral fellow at the MIND Institute. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis. Her clinical interests include assessment and treatment of ASD in children, and research interest includes psychosocial outcomes in families of children with ASD. She is also interested in dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions for ASD.