• students in a learning environment

    Bringing opportunities to enhance teaching skills to faculty

Addressing Microaggressions in Health Professions Learning Environments

Microaggressions are subtle statements and behaviors that unconsciously communicate denigrating messages to individuals or groups based on some aspect of their identity (Nadal, 2011, Sue, 2010). Using examples, data and robust models backed by research, participants in this training will learn how to define, identify and address microaggressions in the health environment. As a result of attending this training, learners will be better equipped to improve patient care and long-term health outcomes in the clinical setting.

At the end of the course learners will be able to:

  • Define microaggressions
  • Identify the role of each member involved in microaggression (Recipient, Source, and Bystander)
  • Discuss the nature of the microaggression including how it could have hurtful impact on the recipients, bystanders, and/or community. Analyze the historical, structural, and cultural context of the microaggression.
  • Explore how the recipient and the source may be viewing the situation differently.
  • Discuss responses from each member involved in the interaction that could build inclusive excellence, repair and reestablish relationships, and restore or protect reputations.

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Understanding How Stereotype Threat Impacts Health Progressions Students

This course is designed for leaders in a clinical learning environment. Using data and examples from current published research on stereotype threat susceptibility, participants will learn to define, recognize and address stereotype threat among their learners. They will also learn how to help mitigate stereotype threat using the growth mindset, high standard feedback, metacognition and other verified techniques.

On completion of this training, learners will be able to:

  • Identify Stereotype threat responses in their own learning environments
  • Recognize and understand student responses including anxiety, compliance and defiance
  • Understand the mental and emotional load of stereotype threat
  • Improve the health learning environment through supporting students experiencing negative emotions and outcomes related to stereotype threat

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Professionalism in the Health Environment

This workshop provides learners the opportunity to learn about the core competencies of professionalism in the health environment. It will equip learners to improve patient care by successfully navigating conflicts between ethical principles, social and cultural values, and the interests of individuals and systems and helping other health professionals and students to do the same.

After this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how a professionalism lapse could be considered a medical error
  • Describe how to conduct a root cause analysis of a professionalism lapse
  • Assess challenges to professionalism improvement and develop professionalism improvement plans
  • Identify Kohlberg’s Levels of Moral Reasoning
  • Use Motivational Interviewing for professionalism engagement

12 Tips for Teaching Clinical Reasoning

After completing this module, the learner will be able to: (1) Identify key strategies for promoting improvement in clinical reasoning in learners; (2) Understand core approaches to teaching clinical reasoning through “compare and contrast” questioning of learners; and (3) Understand strategies for “diagnosing the learner" when learners struggle to collect patient histories and laboratory data and reason to a diagnosis.

**0.5 CME Credits are available for this course.

Training Link for CME Credit  Training Link

Clinical Microteaching: Breaking It Down

At the end of this course, participants should be able to: Demonstrate how to use simple questions to accurately diagnose learners, laying the foundation for effective feedback and efficient clinical teaching. Understand the critical role of learning climate on the educational process and outcomes. Recall the four steps of the One Minute Preceptor. Examine your own communication style and analyze the clinical thinking process of learners to enhance teaching effectiveness.

**0.5 CME Credits are available for this course.

Training Link for CME Credit  Training Link

Curriculum Development

This session will provide fundamental approaches to assessing and evaluating student learning. Participants will learn about assessment tools and techniques as well as strategies for answering the essential question of assessment and evaluation, “how do we know that students are learning what we think we are teaching?”

Writing Learning Objectives and Creating a Blueprint

Writing learning objectives is an important step in curriculum development and is required for syllabi and accreditation. This session will provide the skills needed to craft simply stated learning objectives that clearly outline what will be learned.

Epistemology, and Taxonomies, Assessment and Evaluation Modules

This session is comprised of short, topic-based online modules that explore the concept of Epistemology (the study of the nature of knowledge acquisition) and several learning taxonomies designed to help educators deliver teaching that supports long term learning.

Teaching Clinical Reasoning

Clinical diagnostic errors cause up to 74000 deaths per year. Teaching Clinical Diagnostic reasoning can improve diagnostic accuracy, reduce errors, and improve patient outcomes.

After completing this module, the learner will be able to:

  • Describe dual process clinical reasoning
  • Define problem representation and illness script
  • Demonstrate ability to create a concise problem representation
  • Include diagnostic reasoning education into clinical practice and the classroom
  • Describe methods of evaluating a learners diagnostic reasoning

Fundamentals of Teaching and Learning

This session discusses teaching/learning science and provides the foundational concepts needed to optimize student learning and engagement as well as attain course and programmatic learning outcomes. In this offering from the Interprofessional Teaching Scholars Program (ITSP) we will introduce the fundamentals of curriculum development, instructional strategy and assessment and evaluation of learning. Furthermore we will explore the value and implementation of interprofessional education.

Cultural Humility

In this session we will make visible often unspoken social scripts we hold for “The Other” and for ourselves that may impact our encounters and service to others. If we can see it, we can confront it, interrupt it, and potentially transform it. We will outline key components of Cultural Humility as an approach to interrupt these scripts of inequality. Finally, we will distinguish between Diversity Training, Cultural Competence Education, and Identity Work.

Adult Learning Principles

This session will teach participants how to apply principles of adult learning theory to their teaching and reflect on existing teaching practices to develop a plan for self-improvement.

After completing the training, participants will be able to:

  • Use Knowles’ principles of adult learning
  • Promote learners’ positive self-concept and help them build on their experiences and
  • Use goal orientation in learning

Assessment and Evaluation Modules

This session will provide fundamental approaches to assessing and evaluating student learning. Participants will learn about assessment tools and techniques as well as strategies for answering the essential question of assessment and evaluation: "how do we know that students are learning what we think we are teaching?"

Mobile Summer Institutes On Scientific Teaching

Based on the nationally acclaimed Summer Institutes on Scientific Teaching, the Mobile Summer Institutes is a five-day location-specific offering hosted at UC Davis for our faculty educators.

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