The Mentoring Academy for Research Excellence uses the “Entering Mentoring,” curriculum as a base for our training. The workshops are designed for those who wish to implement process-based, professional development workshops for research mentors. The Entering Mentoring curricula series addresses the new NIGMS guidelines regarding the preparation of mentors involved in training grants. Drs. Schweitzer and Dixon have been trained as master facilitators through the University of Wisconsin's Center for the Improvement of Mentored Experiences in Research by the developers of the “Entering Mentoring” curriculum.

Additional workshops will be added to address our specific needs at UC Davis. For example, we expect to add one on team science for mentors and mentees. Check back for updated information.

Mentoring for Junior Faculty

This course is part of our core curriculum for the Mentoring Academy for Research Excellence workshop series.

This introductory workshop includes exercises to help individuals get the most out of their mentoring relationships. This includes how to identify a good mentor, steps to a successful mentoring relationship, differences between sponsors and mentors, how to resolve conflict within a mentoring relationship and the resources that are available through the Mentoring Academy for Research Excellence.

Audience: Designed for assistant and early associate professors but open to all faculty.

This workshop is not currently being offered.

Module 1 - Aligning Expectations and Developing Compacts

This course is part of our core curriculum for the Mentoring Academy for Research Excellence workshop series.

One critical element of an effective mentoring relationship is a shared understanding of what each person expects from the relationship. Problems in a mentoring relationship often arise from misunderstandings about expectations. Importantly, expectations change over time so frequent reflection and clear communication is needed to maintain a collaborative relationship.

Audience: Open to all faculty.

This workshop is not currently being offered.

Module 2 - Maintaining Effective Communication and Assessing Understanding

This course is part of our core curriculum for the Mentoring Academy for Research Excellence workshop series.

Good communication is a key element of any relationship and a mentoring relationship is no exception. As mentors, it is not enough to say that we know good communication when we see it. Rather, it is critical that mentors reflect upon and identify specific characteristics of effective communication and take time to practice communication skills.

Assessing Understanding

Determining if someone understands the content and process of their discipline is not easy, yet this determination is critical to a productive mentoring relationship. Developing strategies to assess a mentee’s understanding, especially of core research, educational or clinical concepts, is an important part of becoming an effective mentor. Moreover, it is important for mentors to be able to identify the causes for a lack of understanding and strategies for addressing such misunderstandings.

Audience: Open to all faculty.

This workshop is not currently being offered.

Module 3 - Addressing Diversity and Inclusion

This course is part of our core curriculum for the Mentoring Academy for Research Excellence workshop series.

Diversity, along a range of dimensions, offers both opportunities and challenges to any relationship. Learning to identify, reflect upon, learn from, and engage with diverse perspectives is critical to forming and maintaining both an effective mentoring relationship as well as a vibrant learning environment. In this session, discussions about how to foster an inclusive environment where everyone can do their best learning and create the highest quality of research, both because of and despite their diverse perspectives.

Audience:  Open to all faculty.

This workshop is not currently being offered.

Module 4 - Promoting Professional Development, Fostering Independence, and Sponsorship

This course is part of our core curriculum for the Mentoring Academy for Research Excellence workshop series.

The ultimate goal of most mentoring relationships is to enable the mentee to identify and achieve some academic and professional outcomes after the training period. Non-research professional development activities are sometimes seen as secondary to the core business of doing research, but are often critically important to identifying and successfully meeting the mentee’s long-term career objectives, as well as to the research itself.

Fostering Independence

An important goal in any mentoring relationship is helping the mentee become independent; yet defining what an independent mentee knows and can do is often not articulated by the mentor or the mentee. Defining what independence looks like across career paths and stages, and developing skills to foster independence is important to becoming an effective mentor. Defining independence becomes increasingly complex in the context of collaborative research.

Audience:  Open to all faculty.

This workshop is not currently being offered.