The guiding principles for this curricular phase include content integration; inclusivity of all SOM departments; earlier clinical experience; weekly schedule standardization with incorporated self-directed learning time; customization of experience through intersessions; strengthened Step 1 preparation; and promotion of student well-being.

Successful completion of this curricular phase entails completion of the eight required courses described below, as well as passage of USMLE Step 1.

Human Architecture and Function (HAF)
This course is the integrated foundation of I-EXPLORE.  It teaches students core concepts in anatomy and histology as a scaffold for the clinical and basic sciences.  It also provides students with an introduction to the Health System Science paradigm, as well as foundational clinical skills in anticipation of the longitudinal clinical experience.

Molecular and Cellular Medicine (MCM)
The Molecular and Cellular Medicine course provides a foundation in the life sciences relevant to the practice of medicine, including biochemistry, genetics, physiology, and pharmacology, while also ensuring comprehensive clinical correlation throughout. Health Systems Science domains of scientific analysis, population and public health, and social and structural determinants of health will also be introduced.

Pathogens and Host Defense (PHD)
This course is an integrated, clinical introduction to the disciplines of medical microbiology, immunology, general pathology, and pharmacology. Medical microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms that infect humans and can cause disease. Immunology studies the immune system, which is a complex network of cells and proteins that defends the body against infection. Pathology is the science of the causes and effects of diseases, with particular emphasis on the associated gross and microscopic changes in tissues. Pharmacology is the science of the uses, effects, and modes of action of drugs. The Health Systems Science components of this course will include an introduction to social determinants of health and health equity, as the systems in which our patients live greatly affect presentations and outcomes of infections and immune-related diseases. Principles of scientific analysis will also be revisited.

Cardiovascular, Pulmonary, and Renal Systems (CPR)
The course will build upon the fundamentals established in Human Architecture and Function, Molecular and Cellular Medicine, and Pathogens and Host Defense to demonstrate the relationship between structure, function, and disease in the circulatory, cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems. Through active learning and integrative approaches, the course will intertwine biochemical, physiological, immunological, microbiological, and pathological aspects of these organs in the context of disease, treatment, and prevention.

I-RESTORE (Intersession Course)
I-RESTORE is comprised of four one-week sessions occurring at regular intervals in years 1 and 2, and four weeks of selective course work during the summer between years 1 and 2. This course focuses on professional identity formation. It will provide students opportunities to engage in guided reflection on their experiences in each of the three curricular pillars essential to growth and development of a professional identity, using tools derived from the humanities and sociology. This course will build toward the formation of the master adaptive learner who can thrive as a physician, is able to quickly absorb new information, challenge pre-set assumptions, and grow their skillset and personal well-being throughout their career.

Clinical Experience 
The Longitudinal Clinical Experience (LCE) places medical students in an ambulatory clinic setting beginning in Year 1 and extending through Year 2.  Approximately one afternoon every other week, students travel to their assigned clinic to practice clinical skills and learn about the ambulatory care environment under the direct guidance of supervising physicians.

Clinical Skills
Clinical skills content introduces students to core concepts and principles of physical diagnosis and medical interviewing, with cases designed to build clinical reasoning skills using small group work, standardized patients, and models and manikin simulations. 

Team INQUIRE (Investigating, Naming, Questioning, Understanding, Integrating, and Reporting in Education)
Team INQUIRE is a problem-based learning program in which students take a lead role in deciding the content and direction of their learning. Small groups of students meet with their Team INQUIRE facilitator in three one-hour sessions per week. In the first weekly session, students identify at least 8 learning objectives for the clinical case. Each student is assigned two learning objectives to investigate on their own and present to the group in the two sessions later in the week. Students then discuss the resources used and work to synthesize and reconcile the information learned. Throughout the Team INQUIRE program, the facilitator serves as a process expert rather than a content expert, thereby reinforcing the student-led nature of the learning. Team INQUIRE promotes and practices the foundational life-long learning skills of self-directed learning, independent study, and critical judgment/critical thinking.

UCD 43
The UCD 43 is a list of chief concerns for which patients commonly seek medical care. Students are exposed to each of these concerns during team-based learning and small group clinical reasoning sessions in the pre-clerkship and clerkship phases. These sessions are designed for students to practice their clinical reasoning skills and begin to develop diagnostic schema and illness scripts for the associated conditions.

Endocrinology, Reproduction and Gastrointestinal Systems (EnRGi)
Full integration of biomedical science (“normal”), clinical science (“abnormal”), and health systems science (including health and humanity) occurs in this course for endocrinology, gastroenterology, and reproduction. The male GU system is incorporated into reproduction. Relevant genetics, biochemistry, physiology, pathology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, immunology, microbiology, and threads are included.

Skin and Musculoskeletal Systems (MSK)
Full integration of biomedical science (“normal”), clinical science (“abnormal”), and health systems science (including health and humanity) occurs in this course for musculoskeletal and dermatologic medicine. Relevant genetics, biochemistry, physiology, pathology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, immunology, microbiology, and threads are included. Embedded throughout this course are occasional capstone cases that bring together multiple systems, particularly with musculoskeletal or dermatologic manifestations.

Brain and Behavior (B&B)
Full integration of biomedical science (“normal”), clinical science (“abnormal”), and health systems science (including health and humanity) occurs in this course for neuroanatomy, neuroscience, psychiatry, and bioethics. Head, neck and eye disease is incorporated. Relevant genetics, biochemistry, physiology, pathology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, immunology, microbiology, and threads are included. Embedded throughout this course are occasional capstone cases that bring together multiple systems, particularly with neurologic, otolaryngologic, or ophthalmologic manifestations.

To view the legacy curriculum for pre-clerkship, please click here.